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German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940.

Daniels Antiques / German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940.
German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels AntiquesGerman World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels AntiquesGerman World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels AntiquesGerman World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels Antiques
German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels Antiques
German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels Antiques
German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels Antiques
German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940., Daniels Antiques

German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940.

Description

German World War II Flak Binoculars by Schneider, circa 1940.  Wartime code (dkl)

The optics have be completely restored and rebuilt.  This time consuming process results in crystal clear optics perfect for coastal or mountain views or even star gazing.  The 45 degree viewing angle allows the operator to comfortably use the binoculars for extended periods without neck ache.

The binoculars are mounted to a 1950’s Carl Zeiss oak and brass tripod which is fully adjustable.

These hand-polished WWII German binoculars were originally invented by  Emil Busch optics company.  In the 1930s, three German optics firms submitted designs to compete for the government contract to develop a standard binocular for the German army. The three firms in the running were Emil Busch, Moeller Wedel, and Ernst Leitz (now known as Leica).

The three firms’ prototypes underwent a series of independent tests to determine the best design. Such factors examined were magnification, objective lens diameter, depth perception, field of view, and weight. The latter two factors ultimately decided the winner as Emil Busch, with Emil Busch’s design have the largest field of view and the lightest weight. Used mainly for long-watch land and sky observation by German forces between 1936 and 1945, the magnification power of these 45 degree inclined binoculars are 10 X 80. They were known as the “Doppelfernrohr” or “Flakfernrohr.”

The binoculars were ruggedly constructed so that they could withstand the rigors of field service that included such tasks as daylight observation of enemy troop movements, directing fire from artillery toward advancing enemy troops and armor, directing fire at enemy aircraft, and night observation.

The dkl is the wartime maker’s code for Schneider, so that if they were captured by the enemy, the location of the binoculars factory would remain a secret. The X and triangle that are engraved on the side of the binoculars signify the lubricant codes.

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